Exorzist film

Exorzist Film Filme wie Der Exorzist

The Exorcist ist eine amerikanische Horrorfilmserie, die aus fünf Filmen besteht, die auf dem Roman The Exorcist von William Peter Blatty aus dem Jahr basieren. Die Filme wurden von Warner Bros. Pictures und 20th Century Fox vertrieben. Exorzist II – Der Ketzer. Der Exorzist ist ein US-amerikanischer Horrorfilm aus dem Jahr Er beruht auf dem kam die Fortsetzung des Films mit dem Titel Exorzist II – Der Ketzer in die Kinos. Im Jahr wurde schließlich die zweite Fortsetzung Der Exorzist III veröffentlicht, bei der Jason Miller als Patient X in. Exorzist: Der Anfang ist ein US-amerikanischer Horrorfilm von Renny Harlin aus dem Jahr Der Film ist die Vorgeschichte – oder Prequel – zu den. Der in den Kinos angelaufene „Der Exorzist“ ist bis heute einer der größten – und immer noch gruseligsten – Horrorfilme. Im Horrorklassiker Der Exorzist wird eine jährige Linda Blair vom Teufel besessen. Der Exorzist ist ein Horrorfilm aus dem Jahr von William Friedkin mit Linda Blair, Max von Sydow und Ellen Burstyn. Exorzist: Der Anfang.

exorzist film

Der Exorzist. The Exorcist. USA, HorrorKultfilmeThriller. Dieser spektakuläre Horrorfilm um ein vom Teufel besessenes Mädchen löste in den siebziger. Der Exorzist. ()1h 56min Regan MacNeill, zwölfjährige Tochter der berühmten Filmschauspielerin Chris MacNeill, leidet seit kurzem unter. Die Rede ist von William Friedkins Der Exorzist nach dem Drehbuch von William Peter Blatty, der seinen gleichnamigen Roman für die großen Leinwände der.

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Hell Baby Even worse, terrorists are preparing a full out war on America with a biological weapon. Biskind, Peter Meanwhile, exorzist film evil grows, turning people against learn more here other and resulting in violence, atrocities, and more bloodshed. Consider, star trek discovery auf deutsch commit of this, nor the long scene of exorcism that follows with fire, snakes and several special effectsnor the violent death of Father Morning, please click for source in D. Kinderman Ed Flanders Retrieved At Karras' invitation, it leaves Regan's body and possesses Karras. Again, Friedkin declined her request as he could not wait that long; he also did not think the material was something she would want to be working on while tending to a newborn, which might also make it more difficult for her to work.

Exorzist Film - „Der Exorzist“: Ein Schock, von dem sich das Kino nicht mehr erholte

So wird die fehlende Kommunikation zu eines der zentralen Themen des Films. Die Einblendungen des Gesichts von Captain Howdy? Der letzte Exorzismus: The Next Chapter. Top 5 - Dämonenaustreibung. Die hiesi Wicker Man — Ritual des Bösen. Die beiden Jesuiten beginnen mit der Teufelsaustreibung. Eine Filmkritik von Marie Anderson. Der Tod mister trip Raten gibt ihm Gelegenheit, noch ein paar Dinge geradezurücken. Jan J. Reverend William O'Malley. William Peter Blatty Noel Marshall. Durch mehrere Besuche kommt go here unter Glaubenszweifeln leidende Geistliche zu beerhold julia Überzeugung, dass Regan tatsächlich von einem Dämon besessen ist. Von William Friedkin.

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Erlöse uns von dem Bösen

Greek actor Titos Vandis was cast in the role of Father Karras's uncle. The question of whether or not such a young actress, even a talented one, could carry the film on her shoulders was an issue from the beginning.

Film directors considered for the project were skeptical. The first actresses considered for the part were names known to the public.

Pamelyn Ferdin , a veteran of science fiction and supernatural drama, was a candidate for the role of Regan, but was ultimately turned down because her career thus far had made her too familiar to the public.

Friedkin had started to interview young women as old as 16 who looked young enough to play Regan, but was not finding any who he thought could.

Pictures ' casting department and then with Friedkin. Both mother and daughter impressed the director. Elinore was not a typical stage mother , and Linda's credits were primarily in modeling; she was mainly interested in showing and riding horses around her Westport, Connecticut , home.

Cute but not beautiful. A normal, happy twelve-year-old girl", Friedkin later recalled. With Linda having demonstrated the personal qualities Friedkin was looking for, he then went on to see whether she could handle the material.

He asked if she knew what The Exorcist was about; she told him she had read the book. Friedkin then asked Linda if she knew what masturbation meant.

She was quickly cast as Regan after tests with Burstyn; Friedkin realized he needed to keep that level of spontaneity on set. Friedkin originally intended to use Blair's voice, electronically deepened and roughened, for the demon's dialogue.

Although Friedkin felt this worked fine in some places, he felt scenes with the demon confronting the two priests lacked the dramatic power required and selected legendary radio actress Mercedes McCambridge , an experienced voice actress, to provide the demon's voice.

For the crucifix scene, Linda Blair's own voice was recorded as she yelled out all the demon dialog in a rage. The result was then rerecorded in a slowed-down mode to achieve a very low bass.

The very-low-bass result was then rerecorded at such a speed as to achieve a raging alto male voice. Warners had approached Arthur Penn , Stanley Kubrick , and Mike Nichols to direct, all of whom turned the project down.

Principal photography for The Exorcist began on August 21, Friedkin went to extraordinary lengths manipulating the actors, reminiscent of the old Hollywood directing style, to get the genuine reactions he wanted.

Yanked violently around in harnesses, both Blair and Burstyn suffered back injuries and their painful screams were included in the film. After O'Malley confirmed to Friedkin that he trusted the director, Friedkin slapped him hard across the face to generate a deeply solemn reaction for the last rites scene; this offended the many Catholic crew members on the set.

He also fired blanks [13] without warning on the set to elicit shock from Jason Miller for a take, and told Miller that the pea soup would hit him in the chest rather than the face in the projectile vomiting scene, resulting in his disgusted reaction.

Lastly, he had Regan's bedroom set built inside a freezer so that the actors' breath could be visible on camera, which required the crew to wear cold weather gear.

The film's opening sequences were filmed in and near the city of Mosul , Iraq. The archaeological dig site seen at the film's beginning is the actual site of ancient Hatra , south of Mosul.

The stairs are set back in a small parking lot facing the intersection. Because the house from which Karras falls is set back slightly from the stairs, the film crew constructed an extension with a false front to the house in order to film the scene.

Although the film is set in Washington, D. It was chilled so much that a thin layer of snow fell onto the set one humid morning.

The scenes involving Regan's medical tests were filmed at New York University Medical Center and were performed by actual medical staff that normally carried out the procedures.

The scene in which Father Karras listens to the tapes of Regan's dialogue were filmed in the basement of Keating Hall at Fordham University in the Bronx.

King , S. King's room was photographed by production staff after a visit by Blatty, a Georgetown graduate, and Friedkin. Upon returning to New York, every element of King's room, including posters and books, was recreated for the set, including a poster of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin , S.

Merrin was loosely based. One scene was filmed in The Tombs, a student hangout across from the steps that was founded by a Blatty classmate.

Father Merrin's arrival scene was filmed on Max von Sydow 's first day of work. The scene where the elderly priest steps out of a cab and stands in front of the MacNeil residence, silhouetted in a misty streetlamp's glow and staring up at a beam of light from a bedroom window, is one of the most famous scenes in the movie.

Stuntwoman Ann Miles performed the spider-walk scene in November Friedkin deleted this scene against Blatty's objection just prior to the premiere, as he judged the scene as appearing too early in the film's plot.

In the book, the spider-walk is more muted, consisting of Regan following Sharon around near the floor and flicking a snakelike tongue at her ankles.

A take of this version of the scene was filmed but went unused. However, a different take showing Regan with blood flowing from her mouth was inserted into the Director's Cut of the film.

The Exorcist contained a number of special effects, engineered by makeup artist Dick Smith. In one scene from the film, Max von Sydow is actually wearing more makeup than the possessed girl Linda Blair.

This was because director Friedkin wanted some very detailed facial close-ups. When this film was made, von Sydow was 44, though he was made up to look The Exorcist was also at the center of controversy due to its alleged use of subliminal imagery introduced as special effects during the production of the film.

Wilson Bryan Key wrote a whole chapter on the film in his book Media Sexploitation alleging repeated use of subliminal and semi-subliminal imagery and sound effects.

Key observed the use of the Pazuzu face which Key mistakenly assumed was Jason Miller in death mask makeup, instead of actress Eileen Dietz and claimed that the safety padding on the bedposts were shaped to cast phallic shadows on the wall and that a skull face is superimposed into one of Father Merrin's breath clouds.

Key also wrote much about the sound design, identifying the use of pig squeals, for instance, and elaborating on his opinion of the subliminal intent of it all.

In an interview from the same issue, Friedkin explained, "I saw subliminal cuts in a number of films before I ever put them in The Exorcist , and I thought it was a very effective storytelling device The subliminal editing in The Exorcist was done for dramatic effect—to create, achieve, and sustain a kind of dreamlike state.

If you can see it, it's not subliminal. The editing of the title sequence was the first major project for the film title designer Dan Perri.

As a result of the success of The Exorcist , Perri went on to design opening titles for a number of major films including Taxi Driver , Star Wars , and Gangs of New York Lalo Schifrin 's working score was rejected by Friedkin.

Schifrin had written six minutes of music for the initial film trailer but audiences were reportedly too scared by its combination of sights and sounds.

Warner Bros. It has been claimed Schifrin later used the music written for The Exorcist for The Amityville Horror , [43] but he has denied this in interviews.

In the soundtrack liner notes for his film, Sorcerer , Friedkin said that if he had heard the music of Tangerine Dream earlier, then he would have had them score The Exorcist.

Instead, he used modern classical compositions, including portions of the Cello Concerto No. The music was heard only during scene transitions.

What is now considered the "Theme from The Exorcist", i. In a restored and remastered soundtrack was released by Warner Bros.

That same year, the Japanese version of the original soundtrack LP did not include the Schifrin pieces but did include the main theme from Tubular Bells by Mike Oldfield , and the movement titled Night of the Electric Insects from George Crumb 's string quartet Black Angels.

Lyric writer Lefteris Papadopoulos has admitted that a few years later when he was in financial difficulties he asked for some compensation for the intellectual rights of the song.

Part of Hans Werner Henze 's composition Fantasia for Strings is played over the closing credits.

Upon its December 26, , release, the film received mixed reviews from critics, "ranging from 'classic' to 'claptrap'".

A limited special edition box set was released in for the film's 25th anniversary; it was limited to 50, copies, with available copies circulating around the Internet.

The extended edition was later re-released on DVD and released on Blu-ray with slight alterations under the new label "Extended Director's Cut" on October 5, Since it was a horror film that had gone well over budget and did not have any major stars in the lead roles, Warner did not have high expectations for The Exorcist.

It did not preview the film for critics and booked its initial release for only 30 screens in 24 theaters, [48] mostly in large cities.

None of the theaters were in African American neighborhoods such as South Central Los Angeles since the studio did not expect black people to take much interest in the film; after the theater in predominantly white Westwood showing the film was overwhelmed with moviegoers from South Central it was quickly booked into theaters in that neighborhood.

The site's critical consensus reads, " The Exorcist rides its supernatural theme to magical effect, with remarkable special effects and an eerie atmosphere, resulting in one of the scariest films of all time.

If you want to be shaken—and I found out, while the picture was going, that that's what I wanted—then The Exorcist will scare the The climactic sequences assault the senses and the intellect with pure cinematic terror.

Director Friedkin's film will be profoundly disturbing to all audiences, especially the more sensitive and those who tend to 'live' the movies they see Suffice it to say, there has never been anything like this on the screen before.

Are people so numb they need movies of this intensity in order to feel anything at all? He wrote, "That it received an R rating and not the X is stupefying.

It establishes a new low for grotesque special effects The Exorcist succeeds on one level as an effectively excruciating entertainment, but on another, deeper level it is a thoroughly evil film.

DeMille minus that gentleman's wit and ability to tell a story The angiography scene, in which a needle is inserted into Regan's neck and spurts blood, a procedure Friedkin suggests was actually performed on camera, [81] has come in for some criticism.

By contrast, medical professionals have praised the scene for its accuracy in depicting the procedure.

It is also of historical interest in the field, as around the time of the film's release radiologists had begun to stop using the carotid artery for the puncture as they do in the film, in favor of a more distant artery.

It had already been criticized for its indirect censorship : as many as a third of the films submitted to it had had to be recut after being rated X , meaning no minors could be admitted.

Since many theaters would not show such films, and newspapers would not run ads for them, the X rating greatly limited a non-pornographic film's commercial prospects.

While Friedkin wanted more blood and gore in The Exorcist than had been in any Hollywood film previously, he also needed the film to have an R rating children admitted only with an adult to reach a large audience.

Before release, Aaron Stern, the head of the MPAA ratings board, decided to watch the film himself before the rest of the board. He then called Friedkin and said that since The Exorcist was "an important film", he would allow it to receive an R rating without any cuts.

Some critics, both anticipating and reacting to reports of the film's effect on children who might be or had been taken to see it, questioned the R rating.

While he had praised the film, Roy Meacham, a critic for Metromedia television stations based in Washington, D.

Nevertheless, some had, and he had heard of one girl being taken from the theater in an ambulance. In Washington, the film drew strong interest as well since it was a rare film set in the area that did not involve government activity.

He suggested that the ratings board had somehow yielded to pressure from Warners not to give the film an X rating, which would have likely limited its economic prospects, and was skeptical of MPAA head Jack Valenti 's claims that since the film had no sex or nudity, it could receive an R.

After a week in Washington's theaters, Meacham recalled, authorities cited the crucifix scene to invoke a local ordinance that forbid minors from seeing any scenes with sexual content even where the actors were fully clothed; police warned theaters that staff would be arrested if any minors were admitted to The Exorcist.

He feared that, as a result, communities across the country would feel it necessary to pass their own, perhaps more restrictive, laws regarding the content of movies that could be shown in their jurisdictions.

Two communities, Boston and Hattiesburg, Mississippi , attempted to prevent the film from being shown outright in their jurisdictions.

A court in the former city blocked the ban, saying the film did not meet the U. Supreme Court 's standard of obscenity.

California decision which laid down a new standard for obscenity. New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael echoed Meacham's insinuations that the board had yielded to studio pressure in rating the film R.

But when a movie is as expensive as this one, the [board] doesn't dare give it an X. There was also concern that theaters were not strictly enforcing, or even enforcing at all, the R rating, allowing unaccompanied minors to view the film.

Times critic Lawrence Van Gelder reported that a year-old girl in California said that not only was she sold a ticket to see the film despite no adult being with her, others who seemed even younger were able to do so as well.

Nevertheless, "I think that if a movie ever deserved an X rating simply because it would keep the kids out of the theater, it is 'The Exorcist.

His eventual replacement, Richard Heffner , asked during the interview process if he could see films with controversial ratings, including The Exorcist.

The Exorcist was released in London on March 14, These protests involved members of local clergy and concerned citizens handing out leaflets to those queuing to see the film, offering spiritual support afterwards for those who asked for it.

The Exorcist was available on home video from in the UK. James Ferman , Director of the Board, vetoed the decision to grant a certificate to the film, despite the majority of the group willing to pass it.

It was out of Ferman's concerns that, even with a proposed 18 certificate , the film's notoriety would entice underage viewers to seek it out.

As a result, all video copies of The Exorcist were withdrawn in the UK in and remained unavailable for purchase until Following a successful re-release in cinemas in , the film was submitted for home video release again in February , [96] and was passed uncut with an 18 certificate , signifying a relaxation of the censorship rules with relation to home video in the UK, in part due to James Ferman's departure.

The film was shown on terrestrial television in the UK for the first time in , on Channel 4. The Exorcist set box office records that stood for many years.

For almost half a century, until the adaptation of Stephen King 's It , it was the top-grossing R-rated horror film. Since its release, The Exorcist ' s critical reputation has grown considerably.

The site's critics consensus states, " The Exorcist rides its supernatural theme to magical effect, with remarkable special effects and an eerie atmosphere, resulting in one of the scariest films of all time.

It's absolutely true with The Exorcist—it reflects the anxieties of the audience. Some people think it's an outright horror-fest, but I don't.

It was written by a devout Catholic who hoped it would make people think positively about the existence of God.

William Peter Blatty, who wrote the book, thought that if there are demons then there are also angels and life after death.

He couldn't see why people thought it was scary. I've seen it about times and every time I see something I haven't seen before.

Director Martin Scorsese placed The Exorcist on his list of the 11 scariest horror films of all time. On December 26 a movie called The Exorcist opened in theatres across the country and since then all Hell has broken loose.

Despite its mixed reviews and the controversies over its content and viewer reaction, The Exorcist was a runaway hit. The crowds gathered outside theaters sometimes rioted, and police were called in to quell disturbances in not only New York but Kansas City.

The New York Times asked some of those in line what drew them there. Those who had read the novel accounted for about a third; they wanted to see if the film could realistically depict some of the scenes in the book.

A repeat viewer told the newspaper that it was the best horror film he had seen in decades, "much better than Psycho.

You feel contaminated when you leave the theater. There's something that is impossible to erase. Reports of strong audience reactions were widespread; many including accounts of nausea and fainting.

A woman in New York was said to have miscarried during a showing. Other theaters arranged for ambulances to be on call.

Some patrons had to be helped to leave the places they had hidden in theaters. Friedkin speculates that it is easier to empathize with Regan in that scene, as compared to what she suffers while possessed later in the film.

In , The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease published a paper by a psychiatrist documenting four cases of what he called "cinematic neurosis " triggered by viewing the film.

In all he believed the neurosis was already present and merely triggered by viewing scenes in the film, particularly those depicting Regan's possession.

He recommended that treating physicians view the movie with their patient to help him or her identify the sources of their trauma. Journalists complained that coverage of the film and its controversies was distracting the public from the ongoing Watergate scandal.

Much of the coverage, in fact, focused on the audience which, in the later words of film historian William Paul, "had become a spectacle equal to the film".

He cites an Associated Press cartoon in which a couple trying to purchase tickets to the film was told that while the film itself is sold out, "we're selling tickets to the lobby to watch the audience.

Within a year of The Exorcist ' s release, two films were quickly made that appeared to appropriate elements of its plot or production design.

Warner took legal action against the producers of both, accusing them of copyright infringement. The lawsuits resulted in one film being pulled from distribution and the other one having to change its advertisements.

Abby , released almost a year after The Exorcist , put a blaxploitation spin on the material. In it a Yoruba demon released during an archeological dig in Africa crosses the Atlantic Ocean and possesses the archaeologist's daughter at home in Kentucky.

Director William Girdler acknowledged the movie was intended to cash in on the success of The Exorcist. Warner's lawsuit early in resulted in most prints of the film being confiscated; the film has rarely been screened since and is not available on any home media.

Later in Warner brought suit against Film Ventures International FVI over Beyond the Door , which had also been released near the end of , alleging that its main character, also a possessed woman whose head spins around completely, projectile vomits and speaks with a deep voice when possessed, infringed the studio's copyright on Regan.

Judge David W. Williams of the United States District Court for the Central District of California held first that since Blatty had based the character on what he was told was a true story, Regan was not original to either film and thus Warner could not hold a copyright on Regan.

Even if she had been a creation, she could not be copyrighted since she was subordinate to the story. The writers of the FVI film had also further distanced themselves from an infringement claim by having their possessed female, Jessica, be a pregnant adult woman.

However, he found that some of Beyond the Door ' s advertising graphics, such as an image of light coming from behind a door into a darkened room, and the letter "T" drawn as a Christian cross , were similar enough to those used to promote The Exorcist that the public could reasonably have been confused into thinking the two films were the same, or made by the same people, and enjoined FVI from further use of those graphics.

The film's success led Warner to initiate a sequel , one of the first times a studio had done that with a major film, launching a franchise.

While many of the classic horror films of the s, like Frankenstein and King Kong had spawned series of films over the decades, they had always been secondary properties for the studios.

The other big-budget horror films made in the wake of The Exorcist also led to sequels and franchises of their own. The Exorcist was nominated for ten Academy Awards in , winning two.

It is the first horror film to be nominated for Best Picture. The Exorcist was nominated for seven total Golden Globes in At the 31st Golden Globes ceremony that year, the film won four awards.

To appease the screenwriter and some fans of The Exorcist , Friedkin reinstated the bloody variant of the spider-walk scene for the theatrically re-released version of The Exorcist: The Version You've Never Seen.

Linda R. Hager, the lighting double for Linda Blair, was incorrectly credited for performing the stunt. In , Warner Bros. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Theatrical release poster by Bill Gold. Hoya Productions [1]. Damien Karras , S. Cobb as Lieutenant William F.

Barringer Robert Symonds as Dr. Taney Barton Heyman as Dr. See also: Exorcism of Roland Doe. This section needs additional citations for verification.

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TV Books. BBC Documentary. USA Today. Five friends travel to a cabin in the woods, where they unknowingly release flesh-possessing demons.

A group of camp counselors are stalked and murdered by an unknown assailant while trying to reopen a summer camp which was the site of a child's drowning and a grisly double murder years before.

A year after the murder of her mother, a teenage girl is terrorized by a new killer, who targets the girl and her friends by using horror films as part of a deadly game.

A journalist must investigate a mysterious videotape which seems to cause the death of anyone one week to the day after they view it.

Paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren work to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in their farmhouse.

A visiting actress in Washington, D. Meanwhile, a young priest at nearby Georgetown University begins to doubt his faith while dealing with his mother's terminal sickness.

And, book-ending the story, a frail, elderly priest recognizes the necessity for a show-down with an old demonic enemy.

In late and early , women and men were lined up for blocks. People were known to become ill watching it. Some fainted. Some ran out of the theater in tears.

There were reports of people having to be institutionalized, and at least one miscarriage was attributed to viewing it. No, it wasn't a Rolling Stones Concert.

It was a film called The Exorcist. The conversation centered around how horrible some of the things in the book were.

I had also seen the novel listed on The New York Times Bestseller List, and it seemed as if it would remain there forever. After having been on the waiting list for what seemed like an eternity at the local library, I was finally able to obtain a copy.

It was the first book I had read in one sitting since probably Nancy Drew and The Hidden Staircase quite a few years earlier.

And yes, for it's time it was filled with gut wrenching details of what happens when for some unexplained reason; an innocent girl is possessed by Satan.

As you know the film was made and it spared the movie going public absolutely nothing in the way of details. Certainly many of the people who lined up to see The Exorcist did so to watch some of the more gruesome scenes, the worst of which involved Regan's masturbation with a crucifix.

Yet, the hysteria went well beyond the fact that such scenes were so vividly depicted. I think one needs to look no further than Mel Gibson's The Passion to find the answer as to why.

I'm sure most of you have read the story of people leaving Mel's film in tears, some to the point of being hysterical.

From most articles I have read, it seems that the majority of the audience that was moved were those people of strong religious beliefs.

For many others, the depiction of the brutality in The Passion may have been uncomfortable to sit through, but weren't emotionally effected to any degree.

Much of this same feeling can explain the hysteria surrounding The Exorcist. Those who had a definitive belief in Heaven and Hell, of Good and Evil, of Jesus as The Savior and Satan as the epitome of pure evil were affected by The Exorcist far more than those who were agnostic or just never had a strong belief in spiritual matters.

There is no doubt though that much in the way The Passion did, The Exorcist caused many to reconsider how they felt about their faith.

The Exorcist made the prospect of Satan being alive and well and a life of eternal damnation a very uncomfortable prospect.

The fact that Blatty claims his book and screenplay were based on a true story seemed to give the film even more credibility. For me, The Exorcist has always been more about the never ending conflict between pure evil and pure innocence than about being an average horror story.

There are many more levels to this film than what initially meets the eye. There is no doubt that while the main story revolves around an innocent young girl, Regan McNeil Linda Blair , being inhabited by Satan himself, Blatty enhances it greatly by adding different characters in various stages of conflict.

Yet she is not beyond reproach. In one scene when Reagan's father hasn't called on Regan's birthday, we see her desperately on the phone doing battle with an overseas operator.

The problem is not how vicious the phone call is, but that she does it within ear shot of her daughter as if to drive the point home to Regan how worthless her father is.

When, she finally does seek the aid of Father Damian Karras, we don't feel that she believes in exorcism anymore than he does, but is desperate enough to accept the fact that it is possible and will take any and all measures to save her daughter.

Father Karras Jason Miller is a priest torn by conflict. He is ridden by overwhelming guilt for having abandoned his mother to enter the priesthood.

He is torn spiritually by the confessions of those priests who seek his help as a psychiatrist, so much so that he now questions his own faith.

Yet, he will do what is required of him as a priest concerned about the health of a child. Jack McGowran gives a terrific performance as the alcoholic director filming Chris's latest film in Georgetown.

Kitty Winn is Sharon Spencer, the secretary who works for Chris and always seems to be in the line of fire when Chris is angry.

She is always there but for all the horror she witnesses, Winn appears too bland and emotionless and her performance is probably the weakest in the film.

He has done battle with evil before and he shows us its effect in every scene he occupies. One could pass it off to being just good make-up but it is so much more than that as Sydow demonstrates all the nuances that brings to life a man who has faced Satan and lived to tell about it.

He knows what he is up against, understands he must do it again and the consequences of what that battle may be.

If I have a small complaint with The Exorcist it is in regards to the character of Lt. Kinderman Lee J.

I have never been able to buy into the character. It is not the fault of Cobb who is his usual stalwart self in the role. The whole character should at best have only been necessary for a few brief scenes yet; he has several that go on way too long and do not add anything to the story.

Even in his scenes with Chris or Damian, Kinderman is so odd that he distracts us too much from their characters and it is Chris and Damian's reactions that are more important to us, not his investigation.

For all you trivia buffs out there, Blatty once sued the producers of Columbo, stating they based Peter Falk's character on Kinderman.

If memory serves me correctly Blatty lost that one. As for Director William Friedken, although he won the best director award for The French Connection, for me The Exorcist will always remain his defining film.

The Final half hour of The Exorcist are still as dynamic today as they were 31 years ago, French Connection car chase be damned.

It seems that to many of the younger movie audiences of today, The Exorcist has become more of a joke than anything else.

That's not surprising considering how many times it has been lampooned, even by Linda Blair herself in Repossessed. Yet, if they were to view the film in a more serious vein, not as just another creature feature, they may just find that there really is more to this film than a little girl spewing pea soup and spinning her head around degrees.

It is the ultimate battle between Heaven and Hell and Good and Evil. It is the story of the complete and total degradation of innocence.

It is a study in character, and whether a man torn by the forces surrounding him, can regain his faith and his belief in God and mankind to save the life of a little girl, caught up in forces beyond her control.

Call it a horror film, call it a religious film, call it what you want. For me, The Exorcist is and will always remain a classic in every sense of the word.

And if I regard you as a classic of any kind I have no choice but to leave you with my grade, which for The Exorcist is an A.

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In one scene when Reagan's father hasn't called on Regan's birthday, we see her desperately on the phone doing battle with an overseas operator.

The problem is not how vicious the phone call is, but that she does it within ear shot of her daughter as if to drive the point home to Regan how worthless her father is.

When, she finally does seek the aid of Father Damian Karras, we don't feel that she believes in exorcism anymore than he does, but is desperate enough to accept the fact that it is possible and will take any and all measures to save her daughter.

Father Karras Jason Miller is a priest torn by conflict. He is ridden by overwhelming guilt for having abandoned his mother to enter the priesthood.

He is torn spiritually by the confessions of those priests who seek his help as a psychiatrist, so much so that he now questions his own faith.

Yet, he will do what is required of him as a priest concerned about the health of a child. Jack McGowran gives a terrific performance as the alcoholic director filming Chris's latest film in Georgetown.

Kitty Winn is Sharon Spencer, the secretary who works for Chris and always seems to be in the line of fire when Chris is angry.

She is always there but for all the horror she witnesses, Winn appears too bland and emotionless and her performance is probably the weakest in the film.

He has done battle with evil before and he shows us its effect in every scene he occupies.

One could pass it off to being just good make-up but it is so much more than that as Sydow demonstrates all the nuances that brings to life a man who has faced Satan and lived to tell about it.

He knows what he is up against, understands he must do it again and the consequences of what that battle may be. If I have a small complaint with The Exorcist it is in regards to the character of Lt.

Kinderman Lee J. I have never been able to buy into the character. It is not the fault of Cobb who is his usual stalwart self in the role.

The whole character should at best have only been necessary for a few brief scenes yet; he has several that go on way too long and do not add anything to the story.

Even in his scenes with Chris or Damian, Kinderman is so odd that he distracts us too much from their characters and it is Chris and Damian's reactions that are more important to us, not his investigation.

For all you trivia buffs out there, Blatty once sued the producers of Columbo, stating they based Peter Falk's character on Kinderman.

If memory serves me correctly Blatty lost that one. As for Director William Friedken, although he won the best director award for The French Connection, for me The Exorcist will always remain his defining film.

The Final half hour of The Exorcist are still as dynamic today as they were 31 years ago, French Connection car chase be damned.

It seems that to many of the younger movie audiences of today, The Exorcist has become more of a joke than anything else. That's not surprising considering how many times it has been lampooned, even by Linda Blair herself in Repossessed.

Yet, if they were to view the film in a more serious vein, not as just another creature feature, they may just find that there really is more to this film than a little girl spewing pea soup and spinning her head around degrees.

It is the ultimate battle between Heaven and Hell and Good and Evil. It is the story of the complete and total degradation of innocence.

It is a study in character, and whether a man torn by the forces surrounding him, can regain his faith and his belief in God and mankind to save the life of a little girl, caught up in forces beyond her control.

Call it a horror film, call it a religious film, call it what you want. For me, The Exorcist is and will always remain a classic in every sense of the word.

And if I regard you as a classic of any kind I have no choice but to leave you with my grade, which for The Exorcist is an A. Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends.

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Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. When a 12 year-old girl is possessed by a mysterious entity, her mother seeks the help of two priests to save her.

Director: William Friedkin. Available on Amazon. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. Most of the set burned down, and Blair and Burstyn suffered long-term injuries in accidents.

Ultimately the film took twice as long to shoot as scheduled and cost more than twice its initial budget.

Audiences flocked to it, waiting in long lines during winter weather, many doing so more than once, despite mixed critical reviews. Some viewers had adverse physical reactions, often fainting or vomiting, to scenes such as its protagonist undergoing a realistic cerebral angiography and masturbating with a crucifix.

There were reports of heart attacks and miscarriages; a psychiatric journal carried a paper on "cinematic neurosis" triggered by the film.

Many children were taken to see the film, leading to charges that the MPAA ratings board had accommodated Warner Bros.

The cultural conversation around the film, which also encompassed its treatment of Roman Catholicism , helped it become the first horror film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture , [4] [5] one of ten Academy Awards it was nominated for, winning for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Sound Mixing.

It has remained high in critical esteem and commercial success ever since, for many years after its release remaining the top grosser in the supernatural horror and R-rated horror subcategories.

It became the highest-grossing R-rated film upon release and has had a significant influence on popular culture, [6] [7] several publications have regarded it as one of the greatest horror films of all time.

Lankester Merrin , a veteran Catholic priest who performed an exorcism in the s, is on an archaeological dig in the ancient Iraq city of Hatra.

There he finds an amulet that resembles Pazuzu , a demon of ancient origins with whose history Merrin is familiar.

In Georgetown , actress Chris MacNeil is living on location with her year-old daughter Regan ; she is starring in a film about student activism directed by her friend and associate Burke Dennings.

After playing with a Ouija board and contacting a supposedly imaginary friend whom she calls Captain Howdy, Regan begins acting strangely, using obscene language, and exhibiting abnormal strength; additionally, there is poltergeist like activity in the home at night.

Chris hosts a party, during which Regan comes downstairs unannounced, tells one of the guests—an astronaut—that he will die "up there" and then urinates on the floor.

Later, Regan's bed begins to shake violently, further adding to her mother's horror. Chris consults a number of physicians, but Dr. Klein and his associates find nothing physiologically wrong with her daughter, despite Regan undergoing a battery of diagnostic tests.

One night when Chris is out, Burke Dennings is babysitting a heavily sedated Regan. Chris returns to hear that he has died falling out of the window.

Although this is assumed to have been an accident given Burke's history of heavy drinking, his death is investigated by Lieutenant William Kinderman.

Kinderman interviews Chris. He also consults psychiatrist Father Damien Karras , a Jesuit priest struggling with his faith, which only worsens after the death of his frail mother.

The doctors, thinking that Regan's aberrations are mostly psychological in origin, recommend an exorcism be performed, reasoning that believing oneself to be possessed can sometimes be cured by believing that exorcism works as well.

Chris arranges a meeting with Karras. After Regan speaks backward, in different voices, and exhibits scars in the form of the words "Help Me" on her stomach, Karras is convinced that Regan is possessed.

Believing her soul is in danger, he decides to perform an exorcism. The experienced Merrin is selected for performing the actual exorcism with Karras assisting.

Both priests witness Regan perform a series of bizarre, vulgar acts. They attempt to exorcise the demon, but the stubborn entity, by then claiming to be the Devil himself, toys with them, especially Karras.

Karras shows weakness and is dismissed by Merrin, who attempts the exorcism alone. Karras enters the room later and discovers Merrin has died of a heart attack.

After failing to revive Merrin, the enraged Karras confronts the mocking, laughing spirit, and wrestles Regan's body to the ground.

At Karras' invitation, it leaves Regan's body and possesses Karras. In a moment of self-sacrifice, Karras throws himself out of the window before he can be compelled to harm Regan, killing himself and thus defeating the demon.

Father Dyer, an old friend of Karras, happens upon the scene and administers the last rites to his friend. A few days later, Regan, now back to her normal self, prepares to leave for Los Angeles with her mother.

Although Regan has no apparent recollection of her possession, she is moved by the sight of Dyer's clerical collar to kiss him on the cheek.

Kinderman, who narrowly misses their departure, befriends Father Dyer as he investigates Karras' death. Aspects of Blatty's fictional novel were inspired by the exorcism performed on an anonymous young boy known as "Roland Doe" or "Robbie Mannheim" pseudonyms by the Jesuit priest Fr.

William S. Bowdern , who formerly taught at both St. Louis University and St. Louis University High School. Doe's family became convinced the boy's aggressive behavior was attributable to demonic possession, and called upon the services of several Catholic priests, including Bowdern, to perform the rite of exorcism.

It was one of three exorcisms to have been sanctioned by the Catholic Church in the United States at that time. Later analysis by paranormal skeptics has concluded that Doe was likely a mentally ill teenager acting out, as the actual events likely to have occurred such as words being carved on skin were such that they could have been faked by Doe himself.

Although Friedkin has admitted he is very reluctant to speak about the factual aspects of the film, he made the film with the intention of immortalizing the events involving Doe that took place in , and despite the relatively minor changes that were made, the film depicts everything that could be verified by those involved.

In order to make the film, Friedkin was allowed access to the diaries of the priests involved, as well as the doctors and nurses; he also discussed the events with Doe's aunt in great detail.

Friedkin has said that he does not believe that the "head-spinning" actually occurred, but this has been disputed. Friedkin is secular, despite coming from a Jewish family.

The film's lead roles, particularly Regan, were not easily cast. Although many name stars of the era were considered for the role, with Stacy Keach actually having signed to play Father Karras at one point, Blatty and Friedkin ultimately went with less well-known actors, to the consternation of the studio.

The studio wanted Marlon Brando for the role of Lankester Merrin. According to Friedkin, Paul Newman also wanted to portray Karras.

He originally went to talk to Miller solely about the lapsed Catholicism in the play as a background for the film. Since Miller had not read the novel, Friedkin left him a copy.

Three A-list actresses of the time were considered for Chris. Friedkin first approached Audrey Hepburn , who said she was willing to take the role but only if the movie could be shot in Rome , since she had moved to Italy with her husband.

Since that would have raised the costs of the movie considerably, as well as creating language barriers and making it impossible to work with crew members Friedkin was comfortable with like cinematographer Owen Roizman , he looked next to Anne Bancroft.

She, too, was willing but asked if production could be delayed nine months as she had just gotten pregnant.

Again, Friedkin declined her request as he could not wait that long; he also did not think the material was something she would want to be working on while tending to a newborn, which might also make it more difficult for her to work.

Jane Fonda , next on the list, turned down the film as a "piece of capitalist rip-off bullshit". Blatty also suggested his friend Shirley MacLaine for the part, but Friedkin was hesitant to cast her, given her lead role in another possession film, The Possession of Joel Delaney two years before.

Studio head Ted Ashley vigorously opposed casting her, not only telling Friedkin that he would do so over his dead body, but dramatizing that opposition by making Friedkin walk over him as he lay on the floor, then grabbing the director's leg and telling him he would come back from the dead if necessary to keep Friedkin from doing so.

However, no other alternatives emerged, and Ashley relented. With Burstyn now set in the part, Friedkin was surprised when Miller called him back.

He had read the novel, and told the director "that guy is me", referring to Father Karras.

Miller had had a Catholic education, and had studied to be a Jesuit priest himself for three years at Catholic University of America until experiencing a crisis of faith, just as Karras is at the beginning of the story.

Friedkin thanked him for his interest but told him Keach had already been signed. Miller, who had done some stage acting but had never been in a film, asked to at least be given a screen test.

After taking the train to Los Angeles since he disliked flying , Friedkin had the playwright and Burstyn do the scene where Chris tells Karras she thinks Regan might be possessed.

Afterwards, he had Burstyn interview Miller about his life with the camera focusing on him from over her shoulder, and finally asked Miller to say Mass as if for the first time.

Burstyn felt that Miller was too short for the part, unlike her boyfriend at the time, whom Friedkin had auditioned but passed on.

The director felt the test was promising but, after viewing the footage the next morning, realized Miller's "dark good looks, haunted eyes, quiet intensity, and low, compassionate voice", qualities which to him evoked John Garfield , were exactly what the part needed.

The studio bought out Keach's contract. The film's supporting roles were more quickly cast. After Blatty showed Friedkin a photograph of Gerald Lankester Harding , his inspiration for Father Merrin, Friedkin immediately thought of Max von Sydow for the part; he accepted it as soon as he finished reading the script.

While out seeing a play starring an actor who had been recommended to them for the film, Blatty and Friedkin ran into Lee J.

Cobb , which led to his casting as Lt. Greek actor Titos Vandis was cast in the role of Father Karras's uncle.

The question of whether or not such a young actress, even a talented one, could carry the film on her shoulders was an issue from the beginning.

Film directors considered for the project were skeptical. The first actresses considered for the part were names known to the public.

Pamelyn Ferdin , a veteran of science fiction and supernatural drama, was a candidate for the role of Regan, but was ultimately turned down because her career thus far had made her too familiar to the public.

Friedkin had started to interview young women as old as 16 who looked young enough to play Regan, but was not finding any who he thought could.

Pictures ' casting department and then with Friedkin. Both mother and daughter impressed the director. Elinore was not a typical stage mother , and Linda's credits were primarily in modeling; she was mainly interested in showing and riding horses around her Westport, Connecticut , home.

Cute but not beautiful. A normal, happy twelve-year-old girl", Friedkin later recalled. With Linda having demonstrated the personal qualities Friedkin was looking for, he then went on to see whether she could handle the material.

He asked if she knew what The Exorcist was about; she told him she had read the book. Friedkin then asked Linda if she knew what masturbation meant.

She was quickly cast as Regan after tests with Burstyn; Friedkin realized he needed to keep that level of spontaneity on set.

Friedkin originally intended to use Blair's voice, electronically deepened and roughened, for the demon's dialogue.

Although Friedkin felt this worked fine in some places, he felt scenes with the demon confronting the two priests lacked the dramatic power required and selected legendary radio actress Mercedes McCambridge , an experienced voice actress, to provide the demon's voice.

For the crucifix scene, Linda Blair's own voice was recorded as she yelled out all the demon dialog in a rage. The result was then rerecorded in a slowed-down mode to achieve a very low bass.

The very-low-bass result was then rerecorded at such a speed as to achieve a raging alto male voice. Warners had approached Arthur Penn , Stanley Kubrick , and Mike Nichols to direct, all of whom turned the project down.

Principal photography for The Exorcist began on August 21, Friedkin went to extraordinary lengths manipulating the actors, reminiscent of the old Hollywood directing style, to get the genuine reactions he wanted.

Yanked violently around in harnesses, both Blair and Burstyn suffered back injuries and their painful screams were included in the film.

After O'Malley confirmed to Friedkin that he trusted the director, Friedkin slapped him hard across the face to generate a deeply solemn reaction for the last rites scene; this offended the many Catholic crew members on the set.

He also fired blanks [13] without warning on the set to elicit shock from Jason Miller for a take, and told Miller that the pea soup would hit him in the chest rather than the face in the projectile vomiting scene, resulting in his disgusted reaction.

Lastly, he had Regan's bedroom set built inside a freezer so that the actors' breath could be visible on camera, which required the crew to wear cold weather gear.

The film's opening sequences were filmed in and near the city of Mosul , Iraq. The archaeological dig site seen at the film's beginning is the actual site of ancient Hatra , south of Mosul.

The stairs are set back in a small parking lot facing the intersection. Because the house from which Karras falls is set back slightly from the stairs, the film crew constructed an extension with a false front to the house in order to film the scene.

Although the film is set in Washington, D. It was chilled so much that a thin layer of snow fell onto the set one humid morning.

The scenes involving Regan's medical tests were filmed at New York University Medical Center and were performed by actual medical staff that normally carried out the procedures.

The scene in which Father Karras listens to the tapes of Regan's dialogue were filmed in the basement of Keating Hall at Fordham University in the Bronx.

King , S. King's room was photographed by production staff after a visit by Blatty, a Georgetown graduate, and Friedkin.

Upon returning to New York, every element of King's room, including posters and books, was recreated for the set, including a poster of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin , S.

Merrin was loosely based. One scene was filmed in The Tombs, a student hangout across from the steps that was founded by a Blatty classmate.

Father Merrin's arrival scene was filmed on Max von Sydow 's first day of work. The scene where the elderly priest steps out of a cab and stands in front of the MacNeil residence, silhouetted in a misty streetlamp's glow and staring up at a beam of light from a bedroom window, is one of the most famous scenes in the movie.

Stuntwoman Ann Miles performed the spider-walk scene in November Friedkin deleted this scene against Blatty's objection just prior to the premiere, as he judged the scene as appearing too early in the film's plot.

In the book, the spider-walk is more muted, consisting of Regan following Sharon around near the floor and flicking a snakelike tongue at her ankles.

A take of this version of the scene was filmed but went unused. However, a different take showing Regan with blood flowing from her mouth was inserted into the Director's Cut of the film.

The Exorcist contained a number of special effects, engineered by makeup artist Dick Smith. In one scene from the film, Max von Sydow is actually wearing more makeup than the possessed girl Linda Blair.

This was because director Friedkin wanted some very detailed facial close-ups. When this film was made, von Sydow was 44, though he was made up to look The Exorcist was also at the center of controversy due to its alleged use of subliminal imagery introduced as special effects during the production of the film.

Wilson Bryan Key wrote a whole chapter on the film in his book Media Sexploitation alleging repeated use of subliminal and semi-subliminal imagery and sound effects.

Key observed the use of the Pazuzu face which Key mistakenly assumed was Jason Miller in death mask makeup, instead of actress Eileen Dietz and claimed that the safety padding on the bedposts were shaped to cast phallic shadows on the wall and that a skull face is superimposed into one of Father Merrin's breath clouds.

Key also wrote much about the sound design, identifying the use of pig squeals, for instance, and elaborating on his opinion of the subliminal intent of it all.

In an interview from the same issue, Friedkin explained, "I saw subliminal cuts in a number of films before I ever put them in The Exorcist , and I thought it was a very effective storytelling device The subliminal editing in The Exorcist was done for dramatic effect—to create, achieve, and sustain a kind of dreamlike state.

If you can see it, it's not subliminal. The editing of the title sequence was the first major project for the film title designer Dan Perri.

As a result of the success of The Exorcist , Perri went on to design opening titles for a number of major films including Taxi Driver , Star Wars , and Gangs of New York Lalo Schifrin 's working score was rejected by Friedkin.

Schifrin had written six minutes of music for the initial film trailer but audiences were reportedly too scared by its combination of sights and sounds.

Warner Bros. It has been claimed Schifrin later used the music written for The Exorcist for The Amityville Horror , [43] but he has denied this in interviews.

In the soundtrack liner notes for his film, Sorcerer , Friedkin said that if he had heard the music of Tangerine Dream earlier, then he would have had them score The Exorcist.

An upcoming book titled The Evolution Of William Peter Blatty's The Exorcist III: From Concept To Novel To Screen by author Erik Kristopher Myers will reveal the whole story behind the film's development, and publish never-before-seen images, the original script, studio notes, various drafts of the story as it has evolved, and interviews with Blatty, Dourif, Kermode, Carpenter and many others associated with the film.

Upon its release on December 26, , the film received mixed reviews from critics, "ranging from 'classic' to 'claptrap'".

Director William Friedkin's film will be profoundly disturbing to all audiences, especially the more sensitive and those who tend to 'live' the movies they see… Suffice it to say, there has never been anything like this on the screen before".

However, Vincent Canby , writing in The New York Times , dismissed The Exorcist as "a chunk of elegant occultist claptrap… [A] practically impossible film to sit through… it establishes a new low for grotesque special effects…" [15] Andrew Sarris complained that "Friedkin's biggest weakness is his inability to provide enough visual information about his characters… whole passages of the movie's exposition were one long buzz of small talk and name droppings… The Exorcist succeeds on one level as an effectively excruciating entertainment, but on another, deeper level it is a thoroughly evil film".

DeMille minus that gentleman's wit and ability to tell a story …" [17]. Over the years, The Exorcist ' s critical reputation has grown considerably.

However, the movie has its detractors as well, including Kim Newman who has criticized it for messy plot construction, conventionality and overblown pretentiousness, among other perceived defects.

II: Stephen H. Scheuer wrote that Exorcist II "may just well be the worst sequel in the history of films — a stupefying, boring, vapid and non-scary follow-up to the box-office champ of … Exorcist II is a disaster on every level — a sophomoric script, terrible editing, worst direction by John Boorman, inevitably coupled with silly acting.

In one scene that typifies this lamentable sci-fi horror pic, [Richard] Burton and [James Earl] Jones, two splendid actors, are spouting inane dialogue while Jones is outfitted like a witch doctor".

It was released in two versions and is unintelligible in either". While most reviewers responded negatively to the film, Pauline Kael greatly preferred Boorman's sequel to the original, writing in her review in The New Yorker that Exorcist II "had more visual magic than a dozen movies".

Since Exorcist II's initial release, some notable critics and directors have praised the film. Kim Newman wrote in Nightmare Movies that "it doesn't work in all sorts of ways… However, like Ennio Morricone's mix of tribal and liturgical music, it does manage to be very interesting".

Director Martin Scorsese asserted, "The picture asks: Does great goodness bring upon itself great evil?

This goes back to the Book of Job ; it's God testing the good. I like the first Exorcist , because of the Catholic guilt I have, and because it scared the hell out of me; but The Heretic surpasses it.

Maybe Boorman failed to execute the material, but the movie still deserved better than it got". Author Bob McCabe's book The Exorcist: Out of the Shadows contains a chapter on the film in which Linda Blair said the movie "was one of the big disappointments of my career", [24] and John Boorman confessed that "The sin I committed was not giving the audience what it wanted in terms of horror… There's this wild beast out there which is the audience.

Boorman's illness and constant revising of the script can't have helped, but these events alone are not enough to explain the film's almighty failure.

Boorman has certainly gone on to produce some fine work subsequently… When a list was compiled to find the fifty worst films of all time, Exorcist II: The Heretic came in at number two.

It was beaten only by Ed Wood 's Plan 9 from Outer Space , a film that generally receives a warmer response from its audience than this terribly misjudged sequel".

III: The film met with mixed reviews. It can seem as if nothing is going on in them except dim murmurings about the original movie—murmurings that mostly remind you of what isn't being delivered".

Gleiberman called The Exorcist III "an ash-gray disaster" and that it "has the feel of a nightmare catechism lesson or a horror movie made by a depressed monk".

The Exorcist was nominated for a total of ten Academy Awards in At the 46th Annual Academy Awards ceremony, the film won two statuettes.

The Exorcist was nominated for a total of seven Golden Globes in At the Golden Globes ceremony that year, the film won four awards.

American Film Institute recognition. However it was also nominated for Worst Actor George C. Scott at the Golden Raspberry Awards.

A limited-edition box set was released in It was limited to 50, copies, with available copies circulating around the Internet.

The only difference between the two copies is the recording format. This edition features a new restoration, including both the theatrical version and the "version you've never seen" from It was released on October 5, On September 23, , in preparation for the first film's 41st anniversary, the complete collection of the series was released as The Exorcist: The Complete Anthology containing all five films restored on Blu-ray.

The rest of the installments of the franchise were also given an individual release for the first time on Blu-ray with the exception of Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist which can only be obtained on Blu-ray by purchasing the collection.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Main article: The Exorcist film. Main article: Exorcist: The Beginning.

Main article: Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist. Retrieved February 2, The Ninth Configuration. July 10, Retrieved March 28,

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